American Academy in Rome - Beverly McIver

American Academy in Rome - Beverly McIver

Art professor wins prestigious honor from American Academy in Rome

May 20, 2017

Art professor Beverly McIver is the 2017-18 winner of the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

McIver, a contemporary American artist, is the Esbenshade Professor of the Practice in Duke's Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies. She is among a group of talented Italian and American artists, scholars, writers and composers to be honored by the academy.

Christopher Wilmarth

Christopher Wilmarth

Harvard Museum

May 20, 2017

Reverie: Christopher Wilmarth, Before and After Mallarmé

On view May 20, 2017–August 13, 2017, University Study Gallery, Harvard Art Museums
 
 
In 1978, sculptor Christopher Wilmarth was asked by poet Frederick Morgan to illustrate his translation of a group of seven poems by the French symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé. The resulting print series, known as Breath, is also connected to an elaborate group of works by Wilmarth—charcoal and pastel drawings, etchings, and wall sculptures—each titled after the first line of a Mallarmé poem. This exhibition is selected primarily from these paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints; it focuses on the way that Wilmarth worked in a variety of media to deal with the themes of Mallarmé’s poems and to shape his project. The exhibition also includes related works on loan from two private collections, providing a sense of how the Mallarmé project continued to inform Wilmarth’s sculpture in the years that followed. While the exhibition largely features works related to or emerging from the Mallarmé project, it also highlights several other sculptures from the Harvard Art Museums collections—including two early, Brancusi-inspired wood sculptures (part of a recent gift of the Susan Wilmarth estate) and the recently acquired October Ladders—that have never previously been exhibited at the museums
Artsy editorial on Musing by Helene Verin.  Sitting for a portrait by Philip Pearlstein

Artsy editorial on Musing by Helene Verin. Sitting for a portrait by Philip Pearlstein

This Woman Sat for Warhol, and 36 Years Later She Sat for Philip Pearlstein ARTSY EDITORIAL BY CASEY LESSER MAY 26TH, 2017 8:00 PM

Betty Cuningham Gallery welcomes Tibor de Nagy Gallery to Rivington Street

Betty Cuningham Gallery welcomes Tibor de Nagy Gallery to Rivington Street

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
 
I am pleased to announce that Tibor de Nagy Gallery, under the leadership of Andrew Arnot, will be joining us on the Lower East Side to share our two spaces here on Rivington Street. The two Galleries will maintain their individual programs and operate under the names of Betty Cuningham Gallery and Tibor de Nagy Gallery.  Each Gallery will continue to have a full season of exhibitions, alternating between the two spaces.

The art world has changed, no doubt, since I first opened Cuningham Ward in 1972 - but my commitment has not.  This new association will allow us to continue presenting the same high level programming that the Gallery has long supported by offering us a greater opportunity to concentrate on the artists and estates to whom we are deeply committed.

I look forward to seeing you on Rivington Street,

Betty Cuningham

William Bailey at the Century Club

William Bailey at the Century Club

Object Permanence

Artist Philip Pearlstein / Supporting the Arts

Artist Philip Pearlstein / Supporting the Arts

Written by Rich Copeland - Producer, WITF's Smart Talk

February 9, 2017 8:00PM

Smart Talk is a daily, live, interactive program featuring conversations with newsmakers and experts in a variety of fields and exploring a wide range of issues and ideas, including the economy, politics, health care, education, culture, and the environment.  Smart Talk airs live every week day at 9 a.m. on WITF’s 89.5 and 93.3. 

Listen to Smart Talk live online from 9-10 a.m. weekdays and at 7 p.m. (Repeat of 9 a.m. program) 

Host: Scott LaMar

The canvas is a kind of frontal slab, rather than simply a flat pictorial surface.

The canvas is a kind of frontal slab, rather than simply a flat pictorial surface.

ANDREW FORGE WITH SARAH SANDS CITATION†

December 13, 2016

Andrew Forge Well, it’s a long story… As you know, since I started working with dots I’ve been very interested in the way in which the dot itself seems to invite different doings, in a sense. You want to look at them close, you want to see what the dots are doing when you got your nose stuck in them, then you want to stand back and see what they do at a distance… .

Join us for a Panel Discussion on Rudolf de Crignis

Join us for a Panel Discussion on Rudolf de Crignis

Lecture Begins Promptly at 6:30 pm

December, 7 2016

A conversation about the work of Rudolf de Crignis.

On Veiw Through December 22, 2016

AM I BLUE? RUDOLF DE CRIGNIS’S QUIETLY COMPLICATED WORKS AT BETTY CUNINGHAM REVEAL MINIMALISM’S DEEP AND EXPRESSIVE POTENTIAL

AM I BLUE? RUDOLF DE CRIGNIS’S QUIETLY COMPLICATED WORKS AT BETTY CUNINGHAM REVEAL MINIMALISM’S DEEP AND EXPRESSIVE POTENTIAL

BY Barbara A. MacAdam POSTED 11/22/16 10:26 AM

November 22, 2016

These 14 paintings—six on canvas and eight works on paper, all from the mid 1990s—are as stunning and refined as minimalism can be—and as deceptively complex. Rudolf de Crignis, who died in 2005, was a Swiss-born artist who began his career in performance and video, and aspects of both make themselves felt, barely perceptibly, in his paintings and drawings.

ARTNEWS

ARTNEWS

FRANCIS PICABIA, ART-WORLD JAILER: PHILIP PEARLSTEIN ON ‘ONE OF THE PRIME MOVERS OF MODERN ART,’ IN 1970

November 18, 2016

“Hello and Goodbye, Francis Picabia”
By Philip Pearlstein
September 1970

One of the prime movers of modern art is subject of a major retrospective at the Guggenheim; here an American painter tells how he first studied Picabia, felt liberated by his vanguard ideas, and finally rejected them

BY  POSTED 11/18/16 4:04 PM

 

With the Museum of Modern Art in New York preparing to open a much-anticipated Francis Picabia retrospective on Monday, we turn back to the September 1970 issue of ARTnews, in which Philip Pearlstein wrote an essay about the artist. The Guggenheim Museum had staged a Picabia retrospective in that year (MoMA’s show, reviewed in these pages by Andrew Russeth, is the first the United States since then), and Pearlstein took this article as an opportunity to pen a love letter to the artist. Pearlstein’s piece follows in full below. For more articles about Picabia from the ARTnews archives, consult the Retrospective that appears in our Fall 2016 issue.

THE MORGAN RECEIVES UNIQUE COLLECTION OF WORLD WAR II DRAWINGS AND SKETCHES BY PHILIP PEARLSTEIN

THE MORGAN RECEIVES UNIQUE COLLECTION OF WORLD WAR II DRAWINGS AND SKETCHES BY PHILIP PEARLSTEIN

press release by The Morgan Library & Museum

November 15, 2016

Please find a press release from the Morgan Library & Museum regarding a recent gift of a collection of World War II drawings by Philip Pearlstein. Click the Morgan Library's link to PDF below. 

Visions and Revisions: Stanley Lewis at NYSS & Betty Cuningham

Visions and Revisions: Stanley Lewis at NYSS & Betty Cuningham

Submitted by Margaret McCann on November 8, 2016.

November 8, 2016

Convoluted landscapes and interiors and the threshold between them, Stanley Lewis’s carefully investigated drawings stun. The larger show at NYSS also includes several paintings that track Impressionist perceptual color-light, while tonality in Lewis’s drawings, emanating from lines that amass into textures, approaches expressionism. Lewis follows Giacometti’s emotive inroads with more pleasure than doubt, his searching stabilized both by perspectival logic and moments of detail. Closely viewed, vision opens toward the experiential fields of Abstract Expressionism.

AT EASE WITH G.I. PEARLSTEIN: PHILIP PEARLSTEIN CAPTURES WORLD WAR II ON PAPER AT BETTY CUNINGHAM

AT EASE WITH G.I. PEARLSTEIN: PHILIP PEARLSTEIN CAPTURES WORLD WAR II ON PAPER AT BETTY CUNINGHAM

BY Robert Ayers POSTED 10/05/16 5:07 PM

October 5, 2016

This would be an intriguing show no matter who the artist: in 1943 a young American is drafted and spends three years serving in World War II; throughout the entire time, he records his experience in dozens of drawings and watercolors. The fact that the young man in question is now the major figure painter Philip Pearlstein (who is still going strong at 92) makes the show all the more compelling.

In 11th grade the young Pearlstein had won first prize in both the oil painting and watercolor sections of the National Scholastic High School Contest. His paintings were reproduced in full color in Life magazine. A couple of years later Pearlstein took his copy of Life with him when he reported for duty—evidence that he might be better employed as a sign painter than a frontline infantryman.

The little pictures that make up this exhibition document Pearlstein’s time in training camps in the United States, aboard troop ships crossing the Atlantic, and as a G.I. in occupied Italy. Occasionally, they provide hints of the artistic personality that would blossom in his work from the 1960s onward. There are even a few of them—like the 1943 group of studies of Soldiers Resting, for example—that look forward to the foreshortened prone figures with their splayed and overlapping limbs that characterize his best known work, though of course no naked women appear among his wartime subjects.

Philip Pearlstein Draws Upon Life as a Young Soldier

Philip Pearlstein Draws Upon Life as a Young Soldier

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN

September 27, 2016

Featuring drawings from the 1940s by the revered realist painter Philip Pearlstein, “WWII Captured on Paper” manifests as a stunning historic document. Made from observation and personal experience, the works tell of the physical and emotional realities of a G.I. in an infantry replacement unit during the Second World War.

Pearlstein recalls: “During my freshman year at Carnegie, most of the male student body took the introduction to military training [ROTC] instead of gym, and at the end of the school year, in June 1943, we all met at Fort Meade, Maryland. After being interviewed, all of my friends were assigned to the Signal Corps.” Already recognized for his artistic talent, Pearlstein was able to avoid the same fate, perhaps saving his life. In the National Scholastic High School Art Contest, he had been awarded first and second prize for two paintings that were subsequently featured in the July 16, 1941 issue of Life magazine.

“On instinct, I had taken a copy of the issue with me,” he explained, “and I showed it to the officer who interviewed me. He seemed impressed, but I was assigned to the Infantry rather than the Signal Corps, packed into a very crowded train, and sent to Fort McClellan, Alabama, where four months of violent physical activity, training in a very hot, sun-blinding summer, transformed me from a pudgy, non-athletic person into a surprisingly muscular G.I.”

LIFE IS A HIGHWAY : GREG DRASLER ON HIS NEW SHOW AT BETTY CUNINGHAM GALLERY

LIFE IS A HIGHWAY : GREG DRASLER ON HIS NEW SHOW AT BETTY CUNINGHAM GALLERY

BY Robin Scher POSTED 06/23/16 12:21 PM

June 23, 2016

The result manifests in “Stratocaster Suite,” a series of six luminous 70 x 400 inch oil-painted panels Drasler created for the show. Stretching across the length of a room, “Stratocaster Suite” is an ode to the open road.

Drasler is fond of metaphors. For instance, he once noted in an interview, “I think about the car as a camera, and painting as a vehicle.” But a vehicle for what? In a conversation, condensed and lightly edited below, Drasler expanded on this metaphor and other symbols contained within his work.

Myth, Flesh, and Three Paintings by Charles Garabedian

Myth, Flesh, and Three Paintings by Charles Garabedian

June 4, 2016

There is a small exhibition in memory of Charles Garabedian (1923 – 2016) currently at Sidecar, the adjoining annex space of Betty Cuningham Gallery on the Lower East Side. Consisting of one painting on each of the room’s three walls (the fourth is a large window facing the street), it’s a quick reminder of the long life and prolific output of a Los Angeles painter whose work was filled to bursting with light, color, and a ribald empathy for his fellow human beings.

In the introduction to an interview for Hyperallergic Weekend published the year before he died, Jennifer Samet captures Garabedian’s personality and influence in a single paragraph:

He stays above the fray throughout our conversation, telling the stories of the myths he loves and travel adventures with friends, rather than explaining the work or aesthetic decisions. “You are a humanist,” his wife Gwen calls out to him, when she hears us discussing his personal relationship to Greek tragedy. Garabedian is humble but ambitious; the figures in his paintings are monumental but gawky – relatable heroes and heroines. It is hard to imagine the work of Dana Schutz, Judith Linhares, and Francesco Clemente without Garabedian’s example, although Garabedian would never claim to lead any school; he is too busy with the challenges and fun of the daily work, even at age 91.

Repairing the Damage of Haste: The Still Point and Stir of William Bailey

Repairing the Damage of Haste: The Still Point and Stir of William Bailey

by Barry Nemett on June 4, 2016

June 4, 2016

Minutes before seeing a collection of William Bailey’s meditative still-lifes and figure paintings, I heard, yet again, a series of small-minded and reckless comments by Donald Trump. How soul enriching to leave behind a sleazy Presidential candidate’s hate and hubris to be in the presence of a masterful artist’s refined vision and voice. Bailey’s exhibit at the Betty Cuningham Gallery provides a welcome respite from the kind of nasty energy and ideas Trump-like politicians spew–so different from the picture-perfect, yet unconventional, world to which Bailey transports us.

Philip Pearlstein: ‘I decided I didn’t want to express other artists’ ideas any longer. I wanted to paint what was in front of me’

Philip Pearlstein: ‘I decided I didn’t want to express other artists’ ideas any longer. I wanted to paint what was in front of me’

April 11, 2016

The American artist has pursued an independent path for more than 60 years. Here, he talks about his life and career, from his time in Italy during the second world war and his student days with Andy Warhol to his current practice

The Armory Show review – a more thoughtful, less cash-and-carry art week

The Armory Show review – a more thoughtful, less cash-and-carry art week

The Guardian

March 4, 2016

The market may have cooled but there’s still plenty to see at New York’s art fairs – not least a concerted turnout for African art at the Armory and a grown-up, but still fresh, Independent

What Not to Miss at the Art Show at the Armory

What Not to Miss at the Art Show at the Armory

The New York Times

March 3, 2016

The Art Show, organized by the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) at the Park Avenue Armory, has the fair theme down to a science. Rather than fatigue-inducing roundups of mixed artists, most galleries here are devoting their booths to solo presentations. There is a strong African-American presence this year, many historical shows and a number of concept exhibitions. Alongside these are what might be called the post-retrospective reminder: a gathering of works that follow on the heels of an important museum show. Here are highlights from the 72 exhibitors.

5 Best Booths at the ADAA’s Art Show

5 Best Booths at the ADAA’s Art Show

BlouinArtInfo

March 2, 2016

Today the heavy, wooden doors to the Park Avenue Armory opened to New York’s venerable Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) fair — called the Art Show, for short — with more than 70 galleries touting wares from the 19th century to the present. Among all the events this week, the dealers here appear most posed to place their work upon the grand art-historical mantle, peddling canonical, though thoroughly market-tested artists.

6 Paintings to Die for at the ADAA’s 2016 Edition of The Art Show

6 Paintings to Die for at the ADAA’s 2016 Edition of The Art Show

Observer | Culture

March 2, 2016

In the spirit of not wanting to pit Modern against Contemporary, or group show against solo show, the Observer has decided to select the six paintings at this year’s ADAA/The Art Show that stood out among the rest. It was tough deciding, as this year’s fair is truly better and more diverse than ever.

Charles Garabedian [1923 - 2016]

Charles Garabedian [1923 - 2016]

Press Release from L.A. Louver

February 12, 2016

We are sad to convey the news that artist Charles Garabedian died on February 11, 2016, at the age of 92. The cause of death was prostate cancer.

Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Carnegie Tech to New York

Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Carnegie Tech to New York

Ed Breslin

February 3, 2016

Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Carnegie Tech to New York,—featuring the work of three provocative artists—is as informative as it is pleasurable. As you enter the gallery you are faced with their ensemble photograph, taken on the front lawn of Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Tech in the late 1940s, the beginning of their lifelong friendship.

At Betty Cuningham, Philip Pearlstein Gets to Warhol's Pop Icons First

At Betty Cuningham, Philip Pearlstein Gets to Warhol's Pop Icons First

ArtNet News

January 27, 2016

I'm not for a second accusing Warhol of anything close to plagiarism; his greatest talent, as I've said before, may have been his skill as a sponge, soaking up ideas and imagery that others threw away then turning them into vital parts of our culture. But Pearlstein does deserve some credit as spongee.

Howdy Doody Gravitas: A John Lees Double Bill

Howdy Doody Gravitas: A John Lees Double Bill

November 24, 2015

Like the fabled American nineteenth-century artist Albert Pinkham Ryder, John Lees often works on his paintings for years, even decades, overlaying the canvases with what the French call “couches” of pigment (a word relating to “couch” in English—to lay down on). And he modifies, eliminates, paints over, peers at, thinks about, thinks more about, changes again, scrapes, puts aside (facing the wall), looks at yet again, adds more paint to, further edits, revises, and so encrusts the surfaces in a richly heavy and sometimes bumpy or gravelly, sometimes willfully crude, scumbled textures that may glow with colors both luxuriant and subtle from beneath. So these paintings age with him.

A Fine Insanity: John Lees at Betty Cuningham

A Fine Insanity: John Lees at Betty Cuningham

November 24, 2015

In 1906 the critic Philip Hale remarked that he perceived a “fine insanity” in the work of Marsden Hartley, by which the artist took him to mean “a strong insistence upon the personal interpretations of the subjects chosen.” While Marsden might not be the first name to come to mind in viewing John Lees’ fourth solo exhibition at Betty Cuningham, Lees does harness his unequivocal mastery of paint into building images that speak of a similar, profound commitment to inner reflection.

Greek Tragedies Retold through the “Bad Paintings” of Charles Garabedian

Greek Tragedies Retold through the “Bad Paintings” of Charles Garabedian

November 6, 2015

In deceptively cheery colors, 91-year-old artist Charles Garabedianreimagines famous tales of woe from classical mythology, where murder, torture, and madness abound. “Sacrifice for the Fleet,” now at L.A. Louver, hosts a series of new and recent works born from the artist’s fascination with Greek literature, Biblical texts, and Armenian manuscripts (he is the son of Armenian refugees). A proponent of so-called “Bad Painting,” Garabedian’s paintings possess an illustrative quality, with raw figuration and garish hues. 

JOHN LEES by Ed Breslin

JOHN LEES by Ed Breslin

November 5, 2015

John Lees’s hallmark obsession with his interior life is legendary. The twenty-seven works on view at Betty Cuningham Gallery are concrete examples of his introspective style; they are ponderous, blisteringly intense, and hyperspecific. While his obsessiveness may fuel a rich interior life, it has clearly come at a cost. He seems to have little time or energy left over to pursue that elusive possession of the comfortably successful artist: recognition.

Back to School

Back to School

Ah Haa painting class in November brings accomplished expressionist to town

October 20, 2015

In early November, clocks around here seem to slow down as fallen aspen leaves are plastered to the concrete and light snowfall hints at the winter to come. The empty streets do not profess a dearth of cultural offerings, though.

The Ah Haa School for the Arts has several offerings during the next month: most notably, the Telluride Painting School’s The Central Image Still Life, taught by acclaimed artist and professor John Lees over the course of two weeks, from Nov. 9-20.  

Naked and Ugly and Irresistible

Naked and Ugly and Irresistible

Charles Garabedian

October 20, 2015

If you've never seen works by Los Angeles based artist, Charles Garabedian, let me warn you before you step into LA Louver Gallery to see his latest exhibition. Garabedian's paintings and drawings illustrate dramatic and painful moments of Greek mythology and Christianity. And most of his characters are naked, frightened and rather ugly.

The Art in Playing the Pedestrian

The Art in Playing the Pedestrian

Rackstraw Downes

October 15, 2015

Rackstraw Downes’s mesmerizing urban landscapes of New York have been acquired and displayed for years by the city’s most influential museums. Yet the painter is decidedly in no rush to meet connoisseurs’ demands. Mr. Downes is celebrated, in fact, for never being in a rush. He takes an entire summer to complete a single oil painting of a street scene, working meticulously from first to final stroke. He paints seven days a week, weather permitting, to get at the plein-air truth of the city’s grit and glory.

Charles Garabedian

Charles Garabedian

Beer with a Painter, LA Edition: Charles Garabedian

August 23, 2015

LOS ANGELES — “I can barely remember doing all this,” Charles Garabedian says to me as he flips through the pages of his own museum exhibition catalog, which I have brought along. We are talking in his studio: a no-frills, large street-level space on West Washington Boulevard in Mid-City Los Angeles, with paintings on paper in progress, and endless marks and grids on tabletops and walls—remnants of four decades of painting there. “Well, this thing looks terrible,” Garabedian says, amused, looking at one image, “…but this is pretty good. I guess I’ve done a lot.”

Philip Pearlstein

Philip Pearlstein

Art review: 'Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor,' an exhibition of Pittsburgh greats, is full of surprises

August 23, 2015

“Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York” at The Andy Warhol Museum feels a bit like a family gathering where you learn things about your relatives you hadn’t heard before. It’s a rare look into the career beginnings of two talented young artists who achieved considerable success in both commercial and fine arts, and an opportunity to discover another who later chose to apply her talents elsewhere.

Graham Nickson:  The Hudson Review

Graham Nickson: The Hudson Review

VOL. LXIII No.II

Summer 2015

THE BIG NEWS LAST SEASON WAS THE OPENING OF THE WHITNEY’S new home on Gansevoort Street, near the Hudson River, designed by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop. But there were also other attractions: sculpture exhibitions—abstract and figurative, current and historical— in the U.S. and Europe, as well as an equally wide-ranging, less geographically dispersed group of painting shows. The sculpture exhibits ranged from Vincent Barré’s recent works in France, to Robert Taplin’s witty narratives in Philadelphia, to Anthony Caro’s steel constructions from the 1960s in Los Angeles; the painting exhibits included abstractions by Thomas Nozkowski, Atta Kwami, and Larry Poons, landscapes by Julian Hatton and Graham Nickson, and an engaging, odd-ball installation by Summer Wheat, all in New York. First: the Whitney. The consensus is that Piano got it right. The entrance to the museum, both from the street and inside the generous lobby—or as Piano calls it, “the piazza”—is welcoming, the relation to the High Line is appealing, and the way the building responds to the once gritty neighborhood without calling too much attention to itself is a welcome change from most of what has been erected nearby. The old buildings of the former Meatpacking District, with their deep canopies, still dominate as we approach, testimony to the neighborhood’s recent past, even though the shop fronts are now full of chic clothing instead of sides of beef.

Andrew Forge

Andrew Forge

Standing in the Shadows: On Seeing Andrew Forge and Hearing Morton Feldman

August 12, 2015

Painter David Carbone explores the affinities between painter and composer provoked by visiting Forge’s show at Betty Cuningham this summer (June 4 to August 14, 2015) and hearing Feldman’s Neither at New York City Opera several years earlier.

Artsy Editorial

Artsy Editorial

From Pittsburgh to Promise: The Friendship and Flight of Dorothy Cantor, Philip Pearlstein, and Andy Warhol

June 17, 2015

In 1949, two young, aspiring artists, Philip Pearlstein and Andy Warhol, bought bus tickets out of Pittsburgh. They arrived in New York with a few shopping bags stuffed with clothes, art supplies, and little else. This summer, the Andy Warhol Museum tracks the friendship and flight of the two painters, along with fellow classmate Dorothy Cantor, from their industrial hometown to the lodestar of the 1950s art world. Through paintings and drawings—bolstered by a bewitching cache of ephemera including photos of the friends painting in class or lounging on the beach—“Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York” balances the legacies of three artists who, in the end, followed distinctly different trajectories.

Duke Chronicle

Duke Chronicle

Prof. Bev McIver on Painting, Family and Fragility.

June 15, 2015

There's a clandestine beauty hidden behind the faces of people in our lives. Each individual's thoughts, worries, aspirations, state of being radiate what it means to human, and how as humans we struggle to communicate these thoughts and manifest their sentiments in reality. Professor Beverly McIver captures such nuances of humanity through her paintings. What do you think?

McIver, Esbenshade Professor of the Practice in Studio Arts in Duke's Art History and Visual Studies department, just finished teaching her first semester at Duke. She has gathered accolades including being named as one of the 2011's "Top Ten in Painting" by Art in America and has had her work reviewed by the New York Times. She was featured in an HBO documentary entitled "Raising Renee," which chronicles her experiences taking care of her older sister, who has a mental disability, as McIver's art career grew. The Chronicle spoke with Professor McIver to discuss her artistic inspiration, her experience at Duke and her recent trip to Cuba.

 

New York Times Style Magazine

New York Times Style Magazine

Outside In

June 14, 2015

‘Outsider’ work is finally being welcomed into major institutions, but the sense of difference with which we used to approach it might offer valuable lessons in how to look at all art.

Yale University Art Gallery

Yale University Art Gallery

Rackstraw Downes

Summer of 2015

Rackstraw Downes work is featured on the cover.

Graham Nickson The New Criterion

Graham Nickson The New Criterion

Gallery Chronicle

May 2015

Over forty years ago, the moment Graham Nickson arrived in Italy to paint as a recipient of the Rome Prize, his car was burglarized of his supplies and preparatory work. With nothing to go on, he climbed on to the roof of the American Academy and began to paint the sunset. Nickson has been painting this way ever since, daring to capture nature’s chroma in watercolor and oil. Now for his first exhibition at Betty Cuningham Gallery, recently relocated from Chelsea to the Lower East Side, twenty-four watercolors of his “experience of coming dawn or falling dusk” are matched with a single, monumental oil on canvas, nine by twelve feet, called Tree of Birds (2014).4 In this latest large work depicting a mountain in Australia, rain clouds blot out the sun. The weather presses down. Birds gather and flap around a tree. As I wrote in 2011, Nickson is “heir apparent to the early American modernists Charles Burchfield and Arthur Dove, with synesthetic work that manages to both radiate and rumble.” This latest painting shows nature guiding his brush with an increasing animistic force. For a painter of the sun, Nickson’s greatest power may be in the shadows.

Rackstraw Downes at UCDAVIS

Rackstraw Downes at UCDAVIS

New art lecture series named for Thiebauds

April 24, 2015

The University of California, Davis, is honoring Betty Jean and Wayne Thiebaud by naming a new lecture series for them. The first lecture will be delivered by artist Rackstraw Downes, a MacArthur Foundation fellow, in May.

 

 

Mia Westerlund Roosen upcoming show in Torrington Connecticut

Mia Westerlund Roosen upcoming show in Torrington Connecticut

"Inside Out"

April 23 - May 23, 2015

Five Points Gallery in Torrington Connecticut is announcing their upcoming show. Featuring Mia Westerlund Roosen with Kim Sobel.

HERE’S THE 407-ARTIST LIST FOR THE WHITNEY MUSEUM’S FIRST PERMANENT COLLECTION HANG IN ITS NEW BUILDING

HERE’S THE 407-ARTIST LIST FOR THE WHITNEY MUSEUM’S FIRST PERMANENT COLLECTION HANG IN ITS NEW BUILDING

Bill Traylor

April 13, 2015

The list has a total of 407 artists and groups, and includes a fairly thrilling range of people, from Bill Traylor to Florine Stettheimer to Jordan Wolfson. Asco? The Whitney’s got it.

GLENN GOLDBERG with Phong Bui

GLENN GOLDBERG with Phong Bui

In Conversation

April 2, 2015

I’ve been following the evolution of Glenn Goldberg as a painter since I was exposed to his work in 1986. It was on the occasion of his recent exhibit All Day at Betty Cuningham Gallery (February 28 – April 4, 2015), in cooperation with Jason McCoy Gallery, that I was finally able to view his latest output, and to sit down with him afterwards on-site to catch up and discuss his work, and more.

Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York

Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York

May 30 – September 6, 2015

The Andy Warhol Museum presents Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York, the first exhibition to explore the work of Philip Pearlstein, Andy Warhol, and Dorothy Cantor as students at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon University), and as young artists breaking into the New York Art World in the early 1950s. This early period was one of close association between Warhol and Pearlstein as they were fellow students, roommates in New York, and enthusiastic artists working in commercial illustration. Cantor, one year behind them in school, was equally pursuing her work, but left her practice to start a family with Pearlstein.

American Academy of Arts and Letters

American Academy of Arts and Letters

News Release

March 20, 2015

Congratulations Stanley Lewis.

Betty Cuningham Gallery will be hosting a memorial service for Jake Berthot

Betty Cuningham Gallery will be hosting a memorial service for Jake Berthot

Sunday February 22, 2015 3-5pm

February 22, 2015

At the College of New Rochelle, a Show Meant to Provoke Double Takes

At the College of New Rochelle, a Show Meant to Provoke Double Takes

The New York Times

February 21, 2015

Entering the Castle Gallery at the College of New Rochelle, visitors encounter an arrangement of cherry blossoms in a glass vase. At least that’s what it appears to be. Closer observation reveals that the branch holding the flowers is actually a segment of plumbing pipe and that each delicate bud is a tiny pink toilet made of urethane foam.

Philip Pearlstein: Six Paintings, Six Decades

Philip Pearlstein: Six Paintings, Six Decades

The National Academy Museum, New York

Philip Pearlstein: 

Six Paintings, Six Decades

February 27 – May 11, 2014

National Academy Museum

1083 Fifth Avenue

NYC

 

Opening Reception: February 26, 6 PM

(RSVP to development@nationalacademy.org or call 212.369.4880 x215)

HuffPost Arts & Culture

HuffPost Arts & Culture

The Influence of Andrew Forge

December 5, 2014

Andrew Forge was an influential painter and teacher for years at Yale among other places. His influence was formative for me and I know for many others as well. An ideal tribute to his memory would be a sprawling museum show of his work and the work of artists he influenced, since that's not in my power; I reached out to artists who have generously shared their memories and work below. If you're in New York this December, you can see a couple of Andrew's paintings as they demand to be seen, in the flesh, at The Betty Cuningham Gallery The show is called, "It's Magic!" a group exhibition of works by Andrew Forge, William Bailey, Rackstraw Downes, Jake Berthot, Forrest Bess, Alfonso Fratteggiani Bianchi, John Elderfield, Alison Wilding, and Christopher Wilmarth, December 10 - January 10, 2015 with an opening reception on Saturday, December 13th from 4 -7 pm.

The Annual 2014: Redefining Tradition.

The Annual 2014: Redefining Tradition.

Stanley Lewis to receive the "2014 National Academy Award for Exccellence"

October 1, 2014

Artist Stanley Lewis has won the "2014 National Academy Award for Excellence", due to his participation in the Academy's "Annual 2014: Redefining Tradition." A comprehensive showcase of contemporary art and architecture which features work by National Academicians and artists alike.

A Life That Is 'Good and Scary and Joyous'

A Life That Is 'Good and Scary and Joyous'

Beverly McIver

September 26, 2014

Beverly McIver to join Duke university’s Art history & Visual Studies department as the Ebenshade Professor of the Practice in Studio Arts.

One-Two Punch

One-Two Punch

A great review of Stanley Lewis by Art Critical ; David Carbone

September 21st, 2014

Current exhibit of Stanley Lewis reviewed by ArtCrtical.


"Stanley Lewis’s work is the obverse of what one might think of as a downtown aesthetic. His paintings and drawings, now on view at Betty Cuningham’s new Lower East Side home, carry a real one-two punch. Here are deliberately..." - David Carbone

Artist Stanley Lewis, featured as part of See It Loud

Artist Stanley Lewis, featured as part of See It Loud

Seven Post-War American Painters

A video by Ben Tudhope, featuring Stanley Lewis. Presented in conjunction with See It Loud: Seven Post-War American Painters, on view at the National Academy Museum from September 26, 2013 to January 26, 2014.

Rackstraw Downes: Nature and Art are Physical

Rackstraw Downes: Nature and Art are Physical

A Reading

Rackstraw Downes Nature and Art are Physical: A Reading At the New York Studio School April 8, 2014 The artist will read from his newly published book Nature and Art are Physical: Writings on Art,1967-2008 (Edgewise Press, 2014). Recipient of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, 2009, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, 1998. Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, 1999. Represented in major collections throughout the United States, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY; the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Represented by Betty Cuningham Gallery, Downes lives and works in New York City and Presidio, TX. Lectures begin at 6:30, lectures are free and open to the public. Seating may be limited. 8 W 8th street, NYC

Skill and Subtlety: A Conversation With William Bailey

Skill and Subtlety: A Conversation With William Bailey

February 27, 2014

William Bailey’s current exhibition at the Betty Cuningham Gallery in Chelsea covers a lot of ground. Although it emphasizes recent paintings created both in the U.S. and in Umbria, it also includes works made in 1963 and 1977. Examples of Bailey’s methodically burnished still-life paintings are on view alongside his serenely elegant figure paintings.

Clytie Alexander and Beverly McIver in: Women Choose Women Again

Clytie Alexander and Beverly McIver in: Women Choose Women Again

Visual Arts Center of New Jersey

WOMEN CHOOSE WOMEN AGAIN

 

Visual Arts Center of New Jersey

Main Gallery, Mitzi & Warren Eisenberg Gallery, and Studio X


January 17 - April 13, 2014

Co-curated by Mary Birmingham and Katherine Murdock

 

 

Visual Arts Center of New Jersey
68 Elm Street, Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.9121 fax:908.273.1457

David Bates

David Bates

Modern Art Museum of Forth Worth and the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas

February 9 - May 11, 2014

Brooklyn Rail

Brooklyn Rail

Traylor in Motion: Wonders from New York Collections and Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts

July 15, 2013

His graphite seems enchanted: the simultaneous embrace of two-dimensionality and rejection of linear perspective unfolds sentiment without sentimentality; the merest quaver of a line conjures up droll hens and truculent couples, while poster paint explodes across the cardboard canvases in puffs of citrine and Prussian blue. 

The Shape of the World Passing Before His Eyes

The Shape of the World Passing Before His Eyes

Bill Traylor Finally Gets a Spotlight in New York

July 4, 2013

Bill Traylor’s talent surfaced suddenly in 1939 when he was 85 and had 10 years to live. By then he had left the plantation in southern Alabama where he had been born a slave in 1854, and, after Emancipation, scratched out a living as a sharecropper. He moved to Montgomery, the state capital, where he slept on a pallet in the back room of a funeral parlor and spent his days sitting on a wood box watching the world go by on Monroe Street, the center of the city’s lively black district.

New American Paintings

New American Paintings

A Conversation: Judy Glantzman

May 15, 2013

A CONVERSATION: JUDY GLANTZMAN by New American Paintings
May 15, 2013, 8:30 am 
Filed under: Interview | Tags: A Conversation, Arthur Pena, Judy Glantzman

To know Judy, a wonderful and generous artist and teacher, one has to reconcile her kind spirit with her absolutely gruesome work. Body parts, heads (so many heads!) and objects of destruction are rife throughout her recent solo show at Betty Cunningham Gallery. Glantzman’s raw imagery, what Peter Plagens of the Wall Street Journal called “studenty” (a term Glantzman enjoys) is tough to deal with. Addressing her personal relationship to the idea of war while pulling from the works of Goya and Picasso, Glantzman “orchestrated” over 200 pieces for the viewer to work through, a feat for both sides. After mounting her show and while commuting between Providence and New York, Glantzman and I had a conversation. - Arthur Peña, Dallas Contributor

Two Coats of Paint

Two Coats of Paint

Inspired by Guernica: Judy Glantzman

April 27, 2013

I love it when established artists start something new. After seeing Pablo Picasso's Guernica for the first time three years ago, Judy Glantzman began moving away from the introspective self-portraits she had been making for many years toward a less self-engaged exploration of the devastation caused by war. Determined that she was done with psychological self examination, Glantzman set out to develop a new, more outward-looking visual language. Here are images of a sprawling, roughly hung exhibition at Betty Cuningham in which Glantzman presents powerful work from her ongoing series. 

The New Criterion

The New Criterion

Andrew Forge (1923-2002)

February 2007

Walking into my favorite gallery can be like stepping into grandma’s kitchen when the oven’s on. Something’s cooking, I don’t know what it is, but chances are I’m going to like it. In New York, I depend on a dozen or so galleries for such comfort food. These are the galleries that know what I want before I want it.

The geographies vary—from Chelsea, to SoHo, to the Upper East Side—but the consistency of vision and the strength of personality keep these galleries on the tip of my tongue and in the front of my mind. From the rank novice to the seasoned expert, the secret of the gallery scene is to find places you like and to stick with them. What follows are three of my personal favorites.

Painting and the Struggle for the Whole Self

Painting and the Struggle for the Whole Self

Art Forum

September 1975

Coming as I do from London, where the sidewalks are called “pavements” and are made of neatly joined, level flagstones, the roughly poured, broken, unpatterned concrete that one walks on in New York is always affecting.  My sense of the whole city is colored by that thin, random seeming covering, a mere temporary shell thrown over the sand and mud which the ancient rocks that jut out of the grass in Central Park seem savagely to ignore.  These fissured, pitted sidewalks are treacherous.  I keep my eyes down.  At the same time I am surrounded by buildings and an ever‐changing panorama of reflections.  Clouds and sunlight are inverted below the skyline.  Roads of light open between the buildings.  I am in a state of constant tension between up and down.  The juxtaposition throws up a wholly unfamiliar view of man’s works.  And an unfamiliar view of myself.  The city seems open, provisional, the luxurious and ramshackle upshot of certain freedoms which, in my European experience, are nothing but states of mind, or longing, and have no material presence – unless perhaps in childhood memories of treehouses, dammed streams, and improvised blockhouses under the kitchen table.