Judy Glantzman

Dressing for the Carnival

September 9 - October 17, 2015

JG15395

Judy Glantzman
Every Other Year, 2015
Graphite, ball point pen, Sharpie, acrylic and water color on paper
81 3/4 x 102 inches  (207.65 x 259.08 cm)
JG15395

Laura Emile David after Jacques- Louis David I,II & III, 2015 
Acrylic on Canvas
6 x 6" inches each 
Signed and Dated on verso 

JG15365   JG15366   JG15367

Dressing For the Carnival, Girl 1 after Winslow Homer, 2014 
Acrylic on Canvas
10 x 8 inches
Signed and Dated on verso 
JG14302

 

JG15343

Columbo and Catherine Marie Jean, 2015
Acrylic on Canvas
18 x 24 inches  (45.72 x 60.96 cm)
Signed and dated on verso
JG15343

JG14316

Dressing for the Carnival, Piggyback 1after Winslow Homer, 2014 
Acrylic on Canvas
10 x 8 inches
Signed and Dated on verso 
JG14316

 

JG15401

Ode to Dawn, 2013
Graphite, ball point pen, Sharpie, acrylic and water color on paper
50 x 70 inches  (127 x 177.8 cm)
JG15401

JG15399

Baltimore, 2015
Graphite, ball point pen, Sharpie, acrylic and water color on paper
73 x 55 1/4 inches  (185.42 x 140.34 cm)
JG15399

Press Release

Dressing for the Carnival

September 9 – October 17, 2015

Reception: Wednesday, September 9th, 6 -8:00 PM

“The work started when I saw Winslow Homer’s Dressing for the Carnival in the exhibition, The Civil War, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  The painting drew me in.  I made pen drawings, mapping relationships, rather than pictorially recreating the painting.  I found deep layers of complexity: formal, racial, American relationships.”

Betty Cuningham Gallery is pleased to open its 2015-2016 season with the work of New York based artist, Judy Glantzman. The solo exhibition, titled after the Winslow Homer painting, Dressing for the Carnival, runs from September 9 through October 17, 2015. It will be Glantzman’s fourth solo exhibition with the gallery. The artist will be present for an opening reception on Wednesday, September 9th, 6 – 8 PM.

The exhibition includes approximately fifty small paintings (ranging in size of 6 x 6 inches to 10 x 10 inches), six folded large drawings on paper and two gridded collages. In the small paintings, Glantzman sources images from Homer’s painting as well as from portraits by Jacques-Louis David or stock photos of TV personalities such as Columbo (TV detective), or simply head shots of people on the street. She paints the same portrait repeatedly, finding that each painting revealed a new personality. She refers to these small canvases as “the actors” as they take on her voice. The six folded drawings are done over several months, each drawing a square portion of the whole, often worked on while she commuted to her teaching job.  She paints or draws every image that captures her eye, layering images upon images, month after month, resulting in a visual record of time.  She refers to these folded drawings as “the calendar.” The two larger collages are, for Glantzman, “the Grand Stage.” In these, she pulls from the small paintings and the images from folded drawings as if all were her vocabulary, joining together to complete the opera.

 

Judy Glantzman graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1978.  She began exhibiting in the early 1980’s in the East Village art scene, at Civilian Warfare and Gracie Mansion.  She followed with shows at BlumHelman and Hirschl & Adler Modern in the 1990’s and at Betty Cuningham Gallery for the past decade years.  She had a 30 year retrospective at Dactyl Foundation in spring 2009.

The artist’s work can be seen in numerous public collections, including the Whitney Art Museum, New York, NY; Grey Art Gallery, New York, NY; the Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ; The Progressive Collection, Cleveland, OH; and the Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and grants, most notably the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, 2001; the Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation Grant, 1997; the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant, 1994; and the Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant, 1992.  Glantzman lives and works in New York, NY.